Kvotekamp og kyststatssolidaritet: Norsk-russisk fiskeriforvaltning gjennom 30 år ('Quota Battles and Coast State Solidarity: 30 Years of Norwegian-Russian Fishery Management')

Bergen, Fagbokforlaget, 2006, 152 p. In Norwegian.

Since the mid-1970, Norway and the Soviet Union/Russia have jointly managed the most important fish stocks of the Barents Sea. The main institutional arena for this bilateral cooperation has been the Joint Norwegian-Soviet/Russian Fisheries Commission, which assembled for the first time in 1976. Quotas, fish size and mesh size were the main issues on the Commission's agenda throughout the Soviet period. After the end of the Cold War, enforcement was included, and lately focus has shifted towards long-term, precautionary management strategies for the Barents Sea fish stocks. Sessions in the Commission have developed from intimate two-state negotiations to large-scale conferences. The Commission is today one of the most important meeting points between Norway and Russia in the North. The books provides an overview of the Commission's work throughout 30 years. In addition to chronological chapters about which themes have dominated this work at different times, the book contains chapters about quota establishement and quota exchange, relations to the law of the sea and fisheries management in light of the more overarching political picture in the European north.